May 27, 2011

New to the Reading List: 27 May 2011

(Every week I add new titles to CCLaP's ever-growing "to-read" list, mostly through the free library monitoring service Wowbrary.com; and now thanks to a reader's suggestion, I share that list of new additions each week here at the blog as well, including brief descriptions of why I added them to my list. For the entire reading list including its hundreds and hundreds of titles, visit either CCLaP's Goodreads.com profile or its Amazon wish list.)

Railroaded, by Richard White

Railroaded: The Transcontinentals and the Making of Modern America, by Richard White

I've never really learned the full story (half-myth by now) of the first nation-crossing railroads to be built in the United States in the mid-1800s, utterly transforming this country as a result; so this new "NPR-worthy" look at the subject gives me the perfect excuse to do so.

America Pacifica, by Anna North

America Pacifica, by Anna North

A post-apocalyptic thriller about the remnants of the American population living on a series of islands that used to be California, in which a deeply stratified poor live on top of city-sized piles of garbage that are slowly sliding into the ocean? Yes please!

Rule 34, by Charles Stross

Rule 34, by Charles Stross

The new Charles Stross is here! The new Charles Stross is here! Granted, it's a day-after-tomorrow tale, which unfortunately is his weakest type of writing; but I'll still read it, because I read everything that Charles Stross writes.

The Coffins of Little Hope, by Timothy Schaffert

The Coffins of Little Hope, by Timothy Schaffert

An elderly woman who has written the obits for her family's small-town newspaper for 70 years stumbles across a bizarre kidnapping case which may or may not be a hoax, and which gets stranger with every turn until the village is engulfed in national attention. Sounds fascinating, and is from a writer who already has a strong cult following.

City of Ruins, by Kristine Kathryn Rusch

City of Ruins, by Kristine Kathryn Rusch

This is the latest title to arrive in the mail from our buddies at Pyr, a hard science-fiction tale about a tough female salvage-artist who stumbles across a vast conspiracy concerning banned cutting-edge technology. It looks pretty good, so I hope it's not disappointing!

Cryoburn, by Lois McMaster Bujold

Cryoburn, by Lois McMaster Bujold

It's Hugo time! And as always, I'm going to be trying to read all the nominees for Best Novel between now and when the award is actually given this August in Reno, Nevada. I've already read Ian McDonald's The Dervish House (and don't forget that I interviewed McDonald last year about that book too), and had Connie Willis' Blackout and Mira Grant's Feed show up last week via the Chicago Public Library's reserve system; and now this week it's Lois McMaster Bujold's Cryoburn that's arrived, a good old-fashioned space opera about warring cryogenic companies in a made-up solar system on the far side of the galaxy. Spaceships and laser guns ahoy!

The Book of Disquiet, by Fernando Pessoa

The Book of Disquiet, by Fernando Pessoa

Recommended to me by a good friend of mine, local bizarro author David David Katzman, this is a forgotten Surrealist gem from the Early Modernist era of the 1910s through '30s, a title that Katzman was telling me is slowly starting to become a hotter and hotter one among a certain group of New Weird aficionados. I'm looking forward to checking it out.

One of Our Thursdays is Missing, by Jasper Fforde

One of Our Thursdays is Missing, by Jasper Fforde

Uh-oh -- a new Thursday Next novel is here. I'm all over it, people.

Filed by Jason Pettus at 9:29 AM, May 27, 2011. Filed under: Arts news | Literature |