April 25, 2014

CCLaP Rare: "Love-Songs of Childhood" (1894), by Eugene Field, First Edition First Printing

Love-Songs of Childhood by Eugene Field, First Edition First Printing

Love-Songs of Childhood by Eugene Field, First Edition First Printing

Love-Songs of Childhood by Eugene Field, First Edition First Printing

Love-Songs of Childhood by Eugene Field, First Edition First Printing

Love-Songs of Childhood by Eugene Field, First Edition First Printing

Love-Songs of Childhood by Eugene Field, First Edition First Printing

Love-Songs of Childhood by Eugene Field, First Edition First Printing

Love-Songs of Childhood by Eugene Field, First Edition First Printing

(CCLaP is now selling rare and unusual books through the main website, shipped to customers through USPS Priority Mail and with full refunds always guaranteed. To see the latest full list of volumes for sale, please click here).

Love-Songs of Childhood (1894)
By Eugene Field
First Edition, First Printing

DESCRIPTION: It's a shame that those writers who primarily get known through short ephemeral work (stories in magazines, columns in newspapers, slam poems at open mics) are so quickly destined to get forgotten by the culture at large, because many of these writers were actually the most fascinating people of their times, and it's a shame they didn't leave behind a more substantial body of work to be remembered by. Take Eugene Field, for a good example, the "poet laureate of children's verse" (or so his ravenous fans called him); a true literary vagabond in one of the more interesting times in American literary history (from the end of the Civil War in the 1860s to the dawn of the 20th century, when such authors as Mark Twain, Henry James and Field himself established America's very first globally respected arts community), over his life he put in at least a year apiece in St. Louis, Massachusetts, Galesburg Illinois, Columbia Missouri, St. Joseph Missouri, Kansas City, Denver, and a good stint in Chicago, where he lived literally one block away from CCLaP's headquarters here in the Uptown neighborhood. (His house still stands, for pilgrims who want to visit, at the corner of Clarendon and Hutchinson, in a historical district full of other grand homes from when this was Chicago's first-ever wealthy suburb in the middle of the woods, way back in the 1890s.) And all this time he was plugging away at a series of newspapers syndicated nationally, and getting paid good money for it, delivering a combination of humorous verse, children's poems, witty screeds about intellectuals, and a long-standing feud with Boston, a sort of Dave Barry of his age who was adored by tens of millions of genteel middle-classers.

Thankfully, though, much of this work was eventually collected up into a series of standalone hardback books, most of them first put out through Scribner's; this one today, for example, from 1894, was his second-ever book of children's verses, and contains the very first book appearance ever of what would become one of his most famous poems, "The Gingham Dog and the Calico Cat," otherwise known as "The Duel." (His other big lasting piece is "Wynken, Blynken, and Nod;" if you've ever heard of him at all, it's almost undoubtedly because of one of these two poems.) An extremely hard-to-find volume, as are all of Field's non-illustrated first editions from these years (instead, the public tended to respond much more favorably to the illustrated second editions, the most notorious being Maxfield Parrish's 1904 adaptation of Poems of Childhood), this is a true gem for any serious collector of Victoriana or children's literature, as well as those interested in the first wave of late-19th-century Chicago authors (also including Theodore Dreiser, Upton Sinclair and Carl Sandburg) who helped establish the city's first-ever legitimate artistic bona fides.

CONDITION: Text: Very Good Minus (VG-). In general in pretty good shape for its age, except for a discolored spine, covers that are a bit dirty, a little rubbing on the edges, and a newspaper clipping glued to the inside endpaper. (It's a witty poem from Evanston writer F.M. Bristol, originally published December 28th, 1894, humorously debating the merits between this book and Field's first book of children's poems, Trumpet and Drum.) Issued without a dust jacket. As confirmed by the McBride Guide to the Identification of First Editions, an agreement date of 1894 on both the title page and copyright page confirms this as a first edition, and a lack of additional printing notices makes it a first printing as well.

PROVENANCE: Acquired by CCLaP at the Oak Brook Book Fair, April 2014.

MINIMUM BID: US$150 / BUY THIS MOMENT FOR $300 To the eBay auction

Filed by Jason Pettus at 7:00 AM, April 25, 2014. Filed under: CCLaP Rare | Literature | Profiles | Reviews |