August 4, 2014

CCLaP Rare: "How Book of Cubbing," 1943 (last-ever mention of "Cubbing" versus "Cub Scouts")

How Book of Cubbing (Boy Scouts of America), 1943

How Book of Cubbing (Boy Scouts of America), 1943

How Book of Cubbing (Boy Scouts of America), 1943

How Book of Cubbing (Boy Scouts of America), 1943

How Book of Cubbing (Boy Scouts of America), 1943

How Book of Cubbing (Boy Scouts of America), 1943

How Book of Cubbing (Boy Scouts of America), 1943

How Book of Cubbing (Boy Scouts of America), 1943

How Book of Cubbing (Boy Scouts of America), 1943

(CCLaP is now selling rare and unusual books through the main website, shipped to customers through USPS Priority Mail and with full refunds always guaranteed. To see the latest full list of volumes for sale, please click here).

How Book of Cubbing
Boy Scout of America (1943)
Last Mention Ever of "Cubbing" Versus "Cub Scouts"

DESCRIPTION: The idea of introducing teenagers to the activities of "scouting" goes all the way back to the British Robert Baden-Powell in 1907, with the American version formally incorporated into an organization in 1910; but it wasn't until 20 years later that an official program was introduced for preteens as well, even though various individual experiments had already been tried under such monikers as "Junior Troops," "Boy Rangers" and "Cadet Corps." It was in 1930, though, that the BSA officially started the "Cubbing" program, heavily influenced by both Rudyard Kipling's The Jungle Book and the then popular activity of "Americanizing" Native American culture (still seen in the Cub Scouts to this day, in such details as the "Webelos" program and the graduating "Arrow of Light" award); and now 85 years later, the Cub Scouts are far and away the largest and most popular section of the BSA in general, and the thing they're most known for in the general public eye.

And the BSA has of course been publishing official guidebooks to Scouting activities this entire time too; today's guidebook being auctioned, for example, is from 1943, and is the very last guidebook in history to refer to the program by its old term of "Cubbing," before switching officially to the "Cub Scouts of America" later in the year. (In fact, as you can see in the accompanying photos, there's even a note on the title page about how only some of the references to "Cubbing" within have been changed to "Cub Scouts," because of them literally running out of time before the manuscript had to be sent to press.) A fascinating 400-page slice of history containing literally hundreds of illustrations and photographs (unfortunately including, please be warned, several shots of children in blackface), it's being offered at an ultra-affordable price today because, frankly, it's not worth much to professional full-time book dealers; but this is the ultimate unique gift for any Scouting enthusiast in your life, a document charting an important moment of transition in Cub Scout history when the group really started becoming formalized nationally for the very first time.

CONDITION: Text: Very Good (VG). Designed especially ruggedly for outdoor handling by children, this volume is still in great shape for its 71-year-old age, except for various stains on its heavy fabric covers and a bit of yellowing on the inside flaps. Issued without a dust jacket. The front inside cover includes penciled notes from previous owner Elena Wilkins, as well as a mailing-label sticker from yet another previous owner, Mrs. Donley T. Schultz of Fairmont, West Virginia.

PROVENANCE: Acquired by CCLaP at the Printers Row Book Fair, June 2014, Chicago.

eBay auction
MINIMUM BID: US$20 / BUY THIS MOMENT FOR $40
(If coming across this in the future, see CCLaP's main page at eBay for the relisted auction URL)

Filed by Jason Pettus at 7:00 AM, August 4, 2014. Filed under: CCLaP Rare | Literature | Literature:Nonfiction | Reviews |